Throughout January 2020, FireEye has continued to observe multiple targeted phishing campaigns designed to download and deploy a backdoor we track as MINEBRIDGE. The campaigns primarily targeted financial services organizations in the United States, though targeting is likely more widespread than those we’ve initially observed in our FireEye product telemetry. At least one campaign targeted South Korean organizations, including a marketing agency.

In these campaigns, the phishing documents appeared to be carefully crafted and leveraged some publicly-documented — but in our experience uncommon and misunderstood — TTPs, likely in an effort to decrease detection of the malicious documents’ macros. The actor also used a self-hosted email marketing solution across multiple campaigns. Notably, the payload delivered in these campaigns leveraged a packer previously affiliated with a commonly-tracked threat actor, an overlap that we will explore later.

This blog post will review the theme of these campaigns and their targets, the adversary’s unique tradecraft, the MINEBRIDGE C++ backdoor, some potential attribution overlaps, and importantly — the threat actor’s love of rap music.

Targeting and Lure Detail

While we first identified MINEBRIDGE samples in December, we observed our first phishing campaigns relating to this activity in early January 2020. Email addresses used to send phishing messages were associated with domains that appear to have been registered specifically for this purpose within a few weeks of the activity — and were thematically consistent with the content of the phishing messages.

Additionally, the actor(s) responsible are likely using a self-hosted email marketing solution called Acelle. Acelle adds extended email headers to messages sent via the platform in the format of X-Acelle-<variable>. The messages observed across campaigns using these TTPs have included a “Customer-Id” value matching “X-Acelle-Customer-Id: 5df38b8fd5b58”. While that field remained consistent across all observed campaigns, individual campaigns also shared overlapping “X-Acelle-Sending-Server_Id” and “X-Acelle-Campaign-Id” values. All of the messages also included a “List-Unsubscribe” header offering a link hosted at 45.153.184.84 suggesting that it is the server hosting the Acelle instance used across these campaigns. The sample table for one campaign below illustrates this data:

Timestamp

Sender

Subject

x-acelle-subscriber-id

x-acelle-sending-server-id

x-acelle-customer-id

x-acelle-campaign-id

1/7/20 16:15

info@rogervecpa.com

tax return file

25474792e6f8c

5e14a2664ffb4

5df38b8fd5b58

5e14a2664ffb4

1/7/20 15:59

info@rogervecpa.com

tax return file

22e183805a051

5e14a2664ffb4

5df38b8fd5b58

5e14a2664ffb4

1/7/20

info@rogervecpa.com

tax return file

657e1a485ed77

5e14a2664ffb4

5df38b8fd5b58

5e14a2664ffb4

1/7/20 16:05

info@rogervecpa.com

tax return file

ddbbffbcb5c6c

5e14a2664ffb4

5df38b8fd5b58

5e14a2664ffb4

The URLs requested by the malicious documents and serving the final MINEBRIDGE payloads delivered in each of these campaigns provide additional overlap across campaigns. In all observed cases, the domains used the same bullet-proof hosting service. The URI used to download the final payload was “/team/invest.php” or, in one case, “/team/rumba.php”. Perhaps the most fun overlap, however, was discovered when trying to identify additional artifacts of interest hosted at similar locations. In most cases a GET request to the parent directory of “/team/” on each of the identified domains served up the lyrics to rap group Onyx’s “Bang 2 Dis” masterpiece. We will refrain from sharing the specific verse hosted due to explicit content.

One of the more notable characteristics of this activity was the consistency in themes used for domain registration, lure content, similarities in malicious document macro content, and targeting. Since first seeing these emails, we’ve identified at least 3 distinct campaigns.

Campaign #1: January 7, 2020 – Tax Theme
  • Emails associated with this campaign used the CPA themed domain rogervecpa.com registered in late November and the subject line “Tax Return File” with IRS related text in the message body.
  • The attached payload was crafted to look like an H&R Block related tax form.
  • Observed targeting included the financial sector exclusively.

Campaign #2: January 8, 2020 – Marketing Theme
  • Emails associated with this campaign used the same CPA themed domain rogervecpa.com along with pt-cpaaccountant.com, also registered late November.
  • The subject line and message body offered a marketing partnership opportunity to the victim.
  • The attached payload used a generic theme enticing users to enable macro content.
  • Observed targeting focused on a South Korean marketing agency.

Campaign #3: January 28, 2020 – Recruiting Theme
  • Emails associated with this campaign were sent from several different email addresses, though all used the recruiting-themed domain agent4career.com which was registered on January 20, 2020.
  • The subject line and message body referenced an employment candidate with experience in the financial sector.
  • The attached payload masqueraded as the resume of the same financial services candidate referenced in the phishing email.
  • Observed targeting included the financial sector exclusively.

Quit Stepping All Over My Macros

The phishing documents themselves leverage numerous interesting TTPs including hiding macros from the Office GUI, and VBA stomping.

VBA stomping is a colloquial term applied to the manipulation of Office documents where the source code of a macro is made to mismatch the pseudo-code (hereto referred to as "p-code") of the document. In order to avoid duplicating research and wasting the reader’s time, we will instead reference the impressive work of our predecessors and peers in the industry. As an introduction to the concept, we first recommend reading the tool release blog post for EvilClippy from Outflank. The security team at Walmart has also published incredible research on the methodology. Vesselin Bontchev provides a useful open source utility for dumping the p-code from an Office document in pcodedmp. This tool can be leveraged to inspect the p-code of a document separate from its VBA source. It was adopted by the wider open source analysis toolkit oletools in order to detect the presence of stomping via comparison of p-code mnemonics vs keyword extraction in VBA source.

That is a whole lot of quality reading for those interested. For the sake of brevity, the most important result of VBA stomping as relevant to this blog post is the following:

  • Static analysis tools focusing on VBA macro source extraction may be fooled into a benign assessment of a document bearing malicious p-code.
  • When VBA source is removed, and a document is opened in a version of Office for which the p-code was not compiled to execute, a macro will not execute correctly, resulting in potential failed dynamic analysis.
  • When a document is opened under a version of Office that uses a VBA version that does not match the version of Office used to create the document, VBA source code is recompiled back into p-code.
  • When a document is opened in Office and the GUI is used to view the macro, the embedded p-code is decompiled to be viewed.

The final two points identify some interesting complications in regard to leveraging this methodology more broadly. Versioning complexities arise that toolkits like EvilClippy leverage Office version enumeration features to address. An actor’s VBA stomped document containing benign VBA source but evil p-code must know the version of Office to build the p-code for, or their sample will not detonate properly. Additionally, if an actor sends a stomped document, and a user or researcher opens the macro in the Office editor, they will see malicious code.

Our actor addressed the latter point of this complication by leveraging what we assess to be another feature of the EvilClippy utility, wherein viewing the macro source is made inaccessible to a user within Office by modifying the PROJECT stream of the document. Let’s highlight this below using a publicly available sample we attribute to our actors (SHA256: 18698c5a6ff96d21e7ca634a608f01a414ef6fbbd7c1b3bf0f2085c85374516e):

Document PROJECT stream:

ID="{33C06E73-23C4-4174-9F9A-BA0E40E57E3F}"
Document=ThisDocument/&H00000000
Name="Project"
HelpContextID="0"
VersionCompatible32="393222000"
CMG="A3A1799F59A359A359A359A3"
DPB="87855DBBA57B887C887C88"
GC="6B69B1A794A894A86B"
[Host Extender Info]
&H00000001={3832D640-CF90-11CF-8E43-00A0C911005A};VBE;&H00000000
[Workspace]
ThisDocument=0, 0, 0, 0, C
Module1=26, 26, 388, 131, Z

The above PROJECT stream has been modified. Within the PROJECT stream workspace, a module is referenced. However, there is no module defined. We would expect the unmodified PROJECT stream of this document prior to utilization of a tool to modify it to be as follows:

ID="{33C06E73-23C4-4174-9F9A-BA0E40E57E3F}"
Document=ThisDocument/&H00000000
Module=”Module1”
Name="Project"
HelpContextID="0"
VersionCompatible32="393222000"
CMG="A3A1799F59A359A359A359A3"
DPB="87855DBBA57B887C887C88"
GC="6B69B1A794A894A86B"
[Host Extender Info]
&H00000001={3832D640-CF90-11CF-8E43-00A0C911005A};VBE;&H00000000
[Workspace]
ThisDocument=0, 0, 0, 0, C
Module1=26, 26, 388, 131, Z

It is interesting to note that we initially identified this actor only performing this manipulation on their malicious documents—avoiding any versioning complexities–without actually stomping the p-code to mismatch the VBA source. This seems like an odd decision and is possibly indicative of an actor assessing what “works” for their campaigns. The above malicious document is an example of them leveraging both methodologies, as highlighted by this screenshot from the awesome publicly available web service IRIS-H Digital Forensics:

We can see that the documents VBA source is a blank Sub procedure definition. A quick glance at the p-code identifies both network- based indicators and host- based indicators we can use to determine what this sample would do when executed on the proper Office version. When we attempt to open the macro in the GUI editor, Office gets angry:

For analysts looking to identify this methodology holistically, we recommend the following considerations:

  • The GUI hiding functionality results in an altered project stream wherein a module exists, but there is no module, class, or baseclass defined in the stream. This is a potential static detection.
  • While the macro source is no longer present, there are still static strings present in Module1 in this sample which may indicate Windows APIs leveraged. This is a potential static detection.

  • Utilities like the previously mentioned oletools can do all of this detection for you. If you identify false negatives, false positives, or bugs, the open source project maintainers respond to them regularly like the superheroes that they are:

The above methodology creates questions regarding potential efficiency problems for scaling any sizable campaign using it. While tools like EvilClippy provide the means to create difficult to detect malicious documents that can potentially sneak past some dynamic and static detections, their payloads have the additional burden of needing to fingerprint targets to enable successful execution. While actors with sufficient resources and creativity can no doubt account for these requirements, it is relevant to note that detections for these methodologies will likely yield more targeted activity. In fact, tertiary review of samples employing these techniques identified unrelated activity delivering both Cobalt Strike BEACON and POSHC2 payloads.

We recently expanded our internal FireEye threat behavior tree to accommodate these techniques. At the time of publication, the authors were unable to directly map the methods – PROJECT stream manipulation and VBA stomping – to existing techniques in the MITRE ATT&CK Matrix™ for Enterprise. However, our team submitted these as contributions to the ATT&CK knowledge base prior to publication and will make additional data available for ATT&CK Sightings.

Crossing The Bridge of Khazad-dûm: The MINEBRIDGE Infection Chain

Successful detonation of the previously detailed malicious document results in creation of “uCWOncHvBb.dll” via a call to URLDownloadToFileA to the URL hxxps://marendoger[.]com/team/rumba.php. The returned MINEDOOR packed MINEBRIDGE sample is saved in the executing users AppData directory (Eg: C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\uCWOncHvBb.dll), and then subsequent execution of the DllRegisterServer export via invocation of “regsvr32.exe /s %AppData%\uCWOncHvBb.dll” occurs:

This will result in a ZIP file being retrieved from the URL hxxps://creatorz123[.]top/~files_tv/~all_files_m.bin using the Windows API URLDownloadToFileW. The ZIP file is written to %TEMP%, unzipped to the newly created directory %AppData%\Windows Media Player, and then deleted:

The ZIP file contains legitimate files required to execute a copy of TeamViewer, listed in the file creation area of the IOC section of this post. When a file named TeamViewer.exe is identified while unzipping, it is renamed to wpvnetwks.exe:

After completing these tasks, uCWOncHvBb.dll moves itself to %AppData%\Windows Media Player\msi.dll. The phishing macro then closes the handle to msi.dll, and calls CreateProcessA on wpvnetwks.exe, which results in the renamed TeamViewer instance side-loading the malicious msi.dll located alongside it. The malware ensures its persistence through reboot by creating a link file at %CISDL_STARTUP%\Windows WMI.lnk, which points to %AppData%\Windows Media Player\wpnetwks.exe, resulting in its launch at user logon.

The end result is a legitimate, though outdated (version 11, compiled on September 17, 2018, at 10:30:12 UTC), TeamViewer instance hijacked by a malicious sideloaded DLL (MINEBRIDGE).

MINEBRIDGE is a 32-bit C++ backdoor designed to be loaded by an older, unpatched instance of the legitimate remote desktop software TeamViewer by DLL load-order hijacking. The backdoor hooks Windows APIs to prevent the victim from seeing the TeamViewer application. By default, MINEBRIDGE conducts command and control (C2) communication via HTTPS POST requests to hard-coded C2 domains. The POST requests contain a GUID derived from the system’s volume serial number, a TeamViewer unique id and password, username, computer name, operating system version, and beacon interval. MINEBRIDGE can also communicate with a C2 server by sending TeamViewer chat messages using a custom window procedure hook. Collectively, the two C2 methods support commands for downloading and executing payloads, downloading arbitrary files, self-deletion and updating, process listing, shutting down and rebooting the system, executing arbitrary shell commands, process elevation, turning on/off TeamViewer’s microphone, and gathering system UAC information.

MINEBRIDGE’s default method of communication is sending HTTPS POST requests over TCP port 443. This method of communication is always active; however, the beacon-interval time may be changed via a command. Before sending any C2 beacons, the sample waits to collect the TeamViewer generated unique id (<tv_id>) and password (<tv_pass>) via SetWindowsTextW hooks.

This specific sample continuously sends an HTTP POST request over TCP port 443 with the URI ~f83g7bfiunwjsd1/g4t3_indata.php to each host listed below until a response is received.

  • 123faster[.]top
  • conversia91[.]top
  • fatoftheland[.]top
  • creatorz123[.]top
  • compilator333[.]top

The POST body contains the formatted string uuid=<guid>&id=<tv_id>&pass=<tv_pass>&username=<user_name>&pcname=<comp_name>&osver=<os_version>&timeout=<beacon_interval> where <guid> is a GUID derived from the system’s volume serial number and formatted using the format string %06lX-%04lX-%04lX-%06lX. Additionally, the request uses the hard-coded HTTP User-Agent string "Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 11_1_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/604.3.5 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/11.0 Mobile/15B150 Safari/604.1"

After a response is received, it’s processed for commands. A single response may contain multiple commands. For each command executed, the sample sends an HTTPS POST request over TCP port 443 indicating success or failure. The sample responds to the commands below.

Command

Description

drun

Download and execute an executable from a URL provided in the command. File saved to %TEMP%\<32_rand_chars>.exe.

rundll_command

Download a custom XOR-encoded and LZNT1 compressed DLL from a URL provided in the command and save to %TEMP%\<32_rand_chars>. Decode, decompress, and load the DLL in memory and call its entrypoint.

update_command

Move sample file to <sample_name>.old and download a new version of itself to <sample_name> where <sample_name> is the name of this sample (i.e., msi.dll). Relaunch the hosting TeamViewer application with command-line argument COM1_. Delete <sample_name>.old.

restart_command

Relaunch the hosting TeamViewer application with command-line argument COM1_.

terminate_command

Terminate the hosting TeamViewer application.

kill_command

Create and execute the self-deleting batch script tvdll.cmd to delete all unzipped files as well as the sample file. Terminate the hosting TeamViewer application.

poweroff_command

Shutdown the system.

reboot_command

Reboot the system.

setinterval_command

Update the C2 beacon-interval time.

After executing all commands in the response, the sample sleeps for the designated C2 beacon-interval time. It repeats the process outlined above to send the next C2 beacon. This behavior repeats indefinitely.

The self-deleting batch script tvdll.cmd contains the following content where <renamed_TeamVeiwer> is the renamed TeamViewer executable (i.e., wpvnetwks.exe) and <sample_name> is the name of this sample (i.e., msi.dll).

@echo off
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 5000 > nul
goto nosleep1
:redel1
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 750 > nul
:nosleep1
attrib -a -h -s -r %~d0%~p0TeamViewer_Resource_en.dll
del /f /q %~d0%~p0TeamViewer_Resource_en.dll
if exist  "%~d0%~p0TeamViewer_Resource_en.dll" goto redel1
goto nosleep2
:redel2
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 750 > nul
:nosleep2
attrib -a -h -s -r %~d0%~p0TeamViewer_StaticRes.dll
del /f /q %~d0%~p0TeamViewer_StaticRes.dll
if exist  "%~d0%~p0TeamViewer_StaticRes.dll" goto redel2
goto nosleep3
:redel3
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 750 > nul
:nosleep3
attrib -a -h -s -r %~d0%~p0TeamViewer_Desktop.exe
del /f /q %~d0%~p0TeamViewer_Desktop.exe
if exist  "%~d0%~p0TeamViewer_Desktop.exe" goto redel3
goto nosleep4
:redel4
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 750 > nul
:nosleep4
attrib -a -h -s -r %~d0%~p0TeamViewer.ini
del /f /q %~d0%~p0TeamViewer.ini
if exist  "%~d0%~p0TeamViewer.ini" goto redel4
goto nosleep5
:redel5
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 750 > nul
:nosleep5
attrib -a -h -s -r %~d0%~p0<sample_name>
del /f /q %~d0%~p0<sample_name>
if exist  "%~d0%~p0<sample_name>" goto redel5
goto nosleep6
:redel6
ping 1.1.1.1 -n 1 -w 750 > nul
:nosleep6
attrib -a -h -s -r %~d0%~p0<renamed_TeamVeiwer>
del /f /q %~d0%~p0<renamed_TeamVeiwer>
if exist  "%~d0%~p0<renamed_TeamViewer>" goto redel6
attrib -a -h -s -r %0
del /f /q %0

Possible Connection to Another Intrusion Set

The identified MINEBRIDGE samples have been packed within a loader we call MINEDOOR. Since Fall 2019, we’ve observed a group publicly tracked as TA505 conducting phishing campaigns that use MINEDOOR to deliver the FRIENDSPEAK backdoor. The combination of MINEDOOR and FRIENDSPEAK has also been publicly discussed using the name Get2.

The limited overlap in tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) between campaigns delivering MINEBRIDGE and those delivering FRIENDSPEAK may suggest that MINEDOOR is not exclusive to TA505. Recent campaigns delivering FRIENDSPEAK have appeared to use spoofed sender addresses, Excel spreadsheets with embedded payloads, and campaign-specific domains that masquerade as common technology services. Meanwhile, the campaigns delivering MINEBRIDGE have used actor-controlled email addresses, malicious Word documents that download payloads from a remote server, and domains with a variety of themes sometimes registered weeks in advance of the campaign. The campaigns delivering MINEBRIDGE also appear to be significantly smaller in both volume and scope than the campaigns delivering FRIENDSPEAK. Finally, we observed campaigns delivering MINEBRIDGE on Eastern Orthodox Christmas when Russian-speaking actors are commonly inactive; we did not observe campaigns delivering FRIENDSPEAK during the week surrounding the holiday and language resources in the malware may suggest TA505 actors speak Russian.

It is plausible that these campaigns represent a subset of TA505 activity. For example, they may be operations conducted on behalf of a specific client or by a specific member of the broader threat group. Both sets of campaigns used domains that were registered with Eranet and had the registrant location “JL, US” or “Fujian, CN,” however this overlap is less notable because we suspect that TA505 has used domains registered by a service that reuses registrant information.

Post-compromise activity would likely reveal if these campaigns were conducted by TA505 or a second threat group, however, FireEye has not yet observed any instances in which a host has been successfully compromised by MINEBRIDGE. As such, FireEye currently clusters this activity separately from what the public tracks as TA505.

Acknowledgments

FireEye would like to thank all the dedicated authors of open source tooling and research referenced in this blog post. Further, FireEye would like to thank TeamViewer for their collaboration with us on this matter. The insecure DLL loading highlighted in this blog post was resolved in TeamViewer 11.0.214397, released on October 22, 2019, prior to the TeamViewer team receiving any information from FireEye. Additionally, TeamViewer is working to add further mitigations for the malware’s functionality. FireEye will update this post with further data from TeamViewer when this becomes available.

Indicators of Compromise (IOCs)

Suspicious Behaviors
  • Process lineage: Microsoft Word launching TeamViewer
  • Directory Creation: %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player
  • File Creation:
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\msi.dll
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\msi.dll.old
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\tvdll.cmd
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\wpvnetwks.exe
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\TeamViewer_Resource_en.dll
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\TeamViewer_StaticRes.dll
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\TeamViewer_Desktop.exe
    • %APPDATA%\Windows Media Player\TeamViewer.ini
    • %CSIDL_STARTUP%\Windows WMI.lnk
    • %CSIDL_PROFILE%\<dll_name>.xpdf
    • %TEMP%\<32 random characters>
    • %TEMP%\<32 random characters>.exe
    • %TEMP%\~8426bcrtv7bdf.bin
  • Network Activity:
    • HTTPS Post requests to C2 URLs
    • User-Agent String: "Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 11_1_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/604.3.5 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/11.0 Mobile/15B150 Safari/604.1"

C2 Domains

  • 123faster[.]top
  • conversia91[.]top
  • fatoftheland[.]top
  • creatorz123[.]top
  • compilator333[.]top
Download Domains
  • neurogon[.]com
  • tiparcano[.]com
  • seigortan[.]com
  • marendoger[.]com
  • badiconreg[.]com
Sender Domains
  • pt-cpaaccountant[.]com
  • rogervecpa[.]com
  • agent4career[.]com
  • bestrecruitments[.]com
Phishing Documents

MD5

SHA256

01067c8e41dae72ce39b28d85bf923ee

80e48391ed32e6c1ca13079d900d3afad62e05c08bd6e929dffdd2e3b9f69299

1601137b84d9bebf21dcfb9ad1eaa69d

3f121c714f18dfb59074cbb665ff9e7f36b2b372cfe6d58a2a8fb1a34dd71952

1c883a997cbf2a656869f6e69ffbd027

de7c7a962e78ceeee0d8359197daeb2c3ca5484dc7cf0d8663fb32003068c655

2ed49bd499c9962e115a66665a6944f6

b8f64a83ad770add6919d243222c62471600e64789264d116c560b7c574669ec

3b948368fe1a296f5ed18b11194ce51c

999d4f434bbc5d355656cc2a05982d61d6770a4c3c837dd8ec6aff8437ae405a

4148281424ff3e85b215cd867746b20c

9812123d2367b952e68fa09bd3d1b3b3db81f0d3e2b3c03a53c21f12f1f4c889

54f22fbc84f4d060fcbf23534a02e5f6

7b20e7e4e0b1c0e41de72c75b1866866a8f61df5a8af0ebf6e8dbd8f4e7bdc57

5a3d8348f04345f6687552e6b7469ac1

77a33d9a4610c4b794a61c79c93e2be87886d27402968310d93988dfd32a2ccf

607d28ae6cf2adb87fcb7eac9f9e09ab

f3917832c68ed3f877df4cd01635b1c14a9c7e217c93150bebf9302223f52065

9ba3275ac0e65b9cd4d5afa0adf401b4

18698c5a6ff96d21e7ca634a608f01a414ef6fbbd7c1b3bf0f2085c85374516e

9becd2fd73aa4b36ad9cd0c95297d40b

30025da34f6f311efe6b7b2c3fe334f934f3f6e6024e4d95e8c808c18eb6de03

9cce3c9516f0f15ce18f37d707931775

bf0adb30ca230eee6401861e1669b9cfeaa64122cc29c5294c2198f2d82f760e

9faf9e0c5945876c8bad3c121c91ea15

88c4019e66564ad8c15b189b903276910f9d828d5e180cac30f1f341647278fc

a37e6eeb06729b6108649f21064b16ef

e895dc605c6dcaf2c3173b5ec1a74a24390c4c274571d6e17b55955c9bd48799

ab8dc4ba75aad317abb8ee38c8928db0

212793a915bdd75bede8a744cd99123e2a5ac70825d7b2e1fc27104276a3aafd

b8817253288b395cb33ffe36e0072dc9

ba013420bd2306ecb9be8901db905b4696d93b9674bd7b10b4d0ef6f52fbd069

cb5e5d29f844eb22fecaa45763750c27

4ff9bfde5b5d3614e6aa753cacc68d26c12601b88e61e03e4727ee6d9fe3cdc2

cffda37453e1a1389840ed6ebaef1b0d

c9f6ba5368760bf384399c9fd6b4f33185e7d0b6ea258909d7516f41a0821056

dc0e1e4ec757a777a4d4cc92a8d9ef33

ac7e622e0d1d518f1b002d514c348a60f7a7e7885192e28626808a7b9228eab6

e5c7e82670372e3cf8e8cab2c1e6bc17

eba3c07155c47a47ee4d9b5201f47a9473255f4d7a6590b5c4e7b6e9fc533c08

f93062f6271f20649e61a09c501c6c92

3f4f546fba4f1e2ee4b32193abcaaa207efe8a767580ab92e546d75a7e978a0b

MINEBRIDGE/MINEDOOR Samples

MD5

SHA256

05432fc4145d56030f6dd6259020d16c

182ccc7f2d703ad732ffee0e1d9ae4ae5cf6b8817cc33fd44f203d31868b1e97

0be9911c5be7e6dfeaeca0a7277d432b

65ead629a55e953b31668aac3bd373e229c45eb1871d8466f278f39ebcd5d26b

0dd556bf03ecb42bf87d5ea7ce8efafe

48f6810e50d08c2631f63aae307a7724dba830430f5edd4b90b4b6a5b3c3ca85

15edac65d5b5ed6c27a8ac983d5b97f6

03ff2b3067aa73ecd8830b6b0ea4f7cfa1c7476452b26227fb433265e7206525

1e9c836f997ddcbd13de35a0264cf9f1

23da418912119a1358c9a1a4671ba60c396fff4c4de225fe6a225330147549a7

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